Testing a thesis

By tiefschwarz on Wednesday 12 May 2010 14:35 - Comments (8)
Category: Law & Technology / TILT, Views: 3.543

Klein onderdeel van mijn thesis over netwerk neutraliteit. Dit gedeelte is een abstract juridisch betoog waarom netwerk neutraliteit noodzakelijk is voor het waarborgen van toegang tot de toegevoegde waarde die het internet brengt aan degenen die daaraan hun bijdrage leveren. Input is gewenst, expertise niet noodzakelijk; het is immers een maatschappelijke kwestie.

The creation of an enormous construct as the Internet inevitably is paired with the division of labour to ensure that, as David Hume describes it, any considerable work can be achieved:

“When every individual person labours a-part, and only for himself, his force is too small to execute any considerable work; his labour being employ’d in supplying all his different necessities, he never attains a perfection in any particular art; and as his force and success are not at all times equal, the least failure in either of these particulars must be attended with inevitable ruin and misery. Society provides a remedy for these three inconveniences. By the conjunction of forces, our power is augmented: By the partition of employments, our ability encreases: And by mutual succour we are less expos’d to fortune and accidents. ’Tis by this additional force, ability, and security, that society becomes advantageous.”

The Internet is especially susceptible to the division of labour, and that division is exceptionally effective, both because of its fundamental design choices and the nature of its being. What is less obvious is the division of the benefits that are reaped from the Internet and there is a problem analogous to the dynamic described by Karl Marx in his assertion of the ownership of the means of production.

It is not the intrinsic value of the end points, the architecture or the information that is most important. By themselves, these components are relatively limited in their usefulness. It is the large additional value that is created by a synergy between these components that really matters. Connecting billions of people, enterprises and entities with one another over the Internet is of great value to a society that relies heavily on the consumption of information, and it creates a value larger than the sum of the individual components. Translated into the vast virtual landscape, this additional value or synergetic value is an intangible common that is to be explored, enriched and enjoyed by all who participate.

Most participants however are unaware or oblivious to the notion that this area is in fact a walled garden, surrounded by an invisible fence created by gatekeepers at the front entrances to the network that own the physical infrastructure; the crucial part of the production means in terms of control. In absence of an overall governing body or scheme controlling their moves, these gatekeepers potentially have absolute control over access to the Internet. They are the network providers, and the effect of their control increases the closer they are to the end points since they have a more absolute control over what passes through the gate from which side, and what not.

Although the network providers cannot take physical ownership over the synergetic value of the Internet, the ability to exclude lies only with them. As the key factor in ownership, this excludability leads to some kind of pseudo-ownership. At the same time there is no valid reason for such entitlement since the achievement of the synergetic value is only partially due to the efforts of these gatekeepers, yet they may very well be able to decide how that benefit that is enjoyed through access, by whom, and to what extent.

But surrendering control to them would not only be unjust, it gives undue leverage to those maintaining the gates, and enables them to put up tollbooths along the digital highway. That strategy is bound for success when the point of no return has been reached for those providing content and services and who have implemented the Internet into their operations. Given the specific economic parameters like network economic effects and high entry barriers the threshold for that point of no return is relatively low.

However, deriving income from the pseudo-ownership of the synergetic value of the Internet by holding access to that benefit hostage against a ransom is an abuse of the position assumed through the division of labour by the network providers. Providers should instead seek to get compensated for their contribution through the offering of their primary good. While they are in fact partially responsible for the synergetic value that comes forth from the creation of the Internet, the reward for that is returned in a higher value of that primary good, making their offering more valuable to end users.

Volgende: Network Neutrality and the Internet Infrastructure Resource Commons 06-'10 Network Neutrality and the Internet Infrastructure Resource Commons
Volgende: Books Just Disappeared, Always During The Night 02-'10 Books Just Disappeared, Always During The Night

Comments


By Tweakers user SoLeDiOn, Wednesday 12 May 2010 16:58

Volgens mij is jouw argument als volgt:

Internet is van essentieel sociaal(-economisch) belang, daarom mogen internet providers geen controle hebben over wat er verstuurd mag worden, omdat ze anders te veel macht krijgen over de content en services die op het internet worden aangeboden.

Hier ben ik het mee eens. Volgens mij gaat nu de discussie vooral over bepaald internet verkeer (p2p) een lagere prioriteit mag gegeven worden door internetknooppunten, zodat o.a. mailverkeer niet gedropt hoeft te worden. Mijn argument is dan wat technischer: Er zijn geen fundamentele natuurwetten die een limiet plaatsen op de maximale mogelijke bandbreedte tussen internetknooppunten (kosten voor bandbreedte stijgen minder dan evenredig). Dus moeten providers investeren in internetknooppunten, zodat al het verkeer kan aankomen. Stel dat internetproviders dit niet doen, dan hebben veel gebruikers niets aan hun super-de-luxe verbinding en nemen ze een langzamer internet abonnement. Dus de conclusie van mijn argument is dat traffic shaping wel mag, maar filtering niet.

By Tweakers user wheez50, Wednesday 12 May 2010 17:03

Het aangehaalde stukje van Hume klinkt me in de oren als een specifiek stukje filosofie van specialisatie. Leuk daaraan is dat daarin ook een afhankelijkheid zit. Ik merkte vanmiddag nog dat netneutraliteit een farce was. Ik zocht een plaatje via google dat ik vorige week nog makkelijk kon vinden, maar vandaag was het verdwenen. Op de een of andere manier was het hele domein uit googles database verdwenen. Tweaker als ik ben kon ik het wel terugvinden. Maar ik keek raar op toen de site nog naar behoren functioneerde. Alleen via mijn oude weg (google) was ik ineens buitengesloten. Google heeft die macht dus blijkbaar.

En is het niet discriminerend als een marketinggigant iets wel mag, maar een simpele (en eerlijke !/?) datacarrier niet?

Een semineutraliteit van het internet lijkt me een zeer goed streven. Maar dat sommige bedrijven met directere methoden ala google en (hoe heet die contentleverancier nu die dat gegeven heeft verzonnen? Begonnen al in het vorige millenium vanuit MIT en verzorgde echt veel grotere downloads...edit: akamai) vind ik prima, zolang ik maar gewoon overal kan komen.

Net zoiets als in het echte leven kan je niet overal per vierbaansweg komen. MAar zelfs met een zandweggetje ben ik tevreden als ik op dat ene heel speciale plekkie kan komen. Zolang er maar geen rollen prikkeldraad staan (of arrestatieteams van brein oid) ben ik semi blij met de semineutraliteit.

(edit: of met mijn bovenbuurman: shaping mag, maar filtering niet +1)

[Comment edited on Wednesday 12 May 2010 17:05]


By Tweakers user Punkie, Wednesday 12 May 2010 17:20

IANAL

I dont understand what that "point of no return" is, nor what it implicates. Would you care to elaborate?
From blogpost:
At the same time there is no valid reason for such entitlement since the achievement of the synergetic value is only partially due to the efforts of these gatekeepers, yet they may very well be able to decide how that benefit that is enjoyed through access, by whom, and to what extent.
Why would "being able to decide" yield them too much power? Or too much unchecked power tipping the scales?
SoLeDiOn wrote on Wednesday 12 May 2010 @ 16:58:
... (kosten voor bandbreedte stijgen minder dan evenredig)...
minder of meer?
SoLeDiOn wrote on Wednesday 12 May 2010 @ 16:58:
Volgens mij gaat nu de discussie vooral over bepaald internet verkeer (p2p) een lagere prioriteit mag gegeven worden door internetknooppunten
Ik dacht het niet. De blog heeft het over over het grotere debat of over het wenselijk is dat isp of content providers of wie dan ook mogen sleutelen aan de toegang tot het net. p2p of voip beÔnvloeden is slechts een heel klein element. Net zoals throttling technieken.
Daarinboven is het niet uitgesloten dat er uitzonderingen kunnen komen, maar eerst moeten we het hebben over het algemene principe.

[Comment edited on Wednesday 12 May 2010 17:27]


By Tweakers user Punkie, Wednesday 12 May 2010 17:25

wheez50 wrote on Wednesday 12 May 2010 @ 17:03:
En is het niet discriminerend als een marketinggigant iets wel mag, maar een simpele (en eerlijke !/?) datacarrier niet?
Er zijn tot klachten (en rechtzaken) geweest over ongelijke behandeling van zoekengines? vb. over de ranking algoritmes en het gewicht van bepaalde argumenten.
Mijns inziens zegt dit dat de discriminatie niet kan, ongeacht welke functie de discriminerende actor uitoefent. (tenzij hij eigenaar is)

By Tweakers user Punkie, Wednesday 12 May 2010 17:26

<snip> repost

[Comment edited on Wednesday 12 May 2010 17:27]


By Tweakers user tiefschwarz, Wednesday 12 May 2010 20:32

SoLeDiOn wrote on Wednesday 12 May 2010 @ 16:58:
Volgens mij is jouw argument als volgt:

Internet is van ... filtering niet.
In essentie is dat inderdaad het punt, alleen dan toegespitst op de meerwaarde die de afzonderlijke componenten van het internet (architectuur, eind punten en content/informatie) los lang niet zoveel waard zijn als gecombineerd. De netwerk providers hebben echter een potentieel slot en de sleutel van die toegevoegde waarde; dat is namelijk de toegang tot het internet. Maar het feit dat ze dit slot hebben, mogen ze het dan ook gebruiken? Op welke grond zouden zij zich deze quasi-eigendom mogen toe-eigenen? Ik ben van mening van niet zoals ook uit de laatste paragraaf valt op te merken.

Wat je zegt over bandbreedte is wat mij betreft een valide punt, maar ik zou het willen uitbreiden met de notie dat netwerk toegang hun primaire goed is dat gedreven wordt door de behoefte van de eindgebruiker. Er is inderdaad een gevaar van een neerwaartse spiraal wanneer netwerk diversiteit ongebreideld toegepast mag worden. Dan verdwijnt de noodzaak om nieuwe technieken voor meer bandbreedte te gaan gebruiken, omdat het bandbreedte tekort ook tot op zekere hoogte door moderatie opgevangen kan worden. Andersom geldt het echter ook: wanneer netwerk diversiteit toegepast kan worden, kunnen premium services aangeboden worden en kunnen netwerk providers makkelijker hun investeringen terugverdienen en nieuwe investeringen doen. Lastige kluif dus!
Punkie wrote on Wednesday 12 May 2010 @ 17:20:
IANAL

I dont understand what that "point of no return" is, nor what it implicates. Would you care to elaborate?
[...]
Why would "being able to decide" yield them too much power? Or too much unchecked power tipping the scales?
In deze context bedoel ik daarmee dat bedrijven, instellingen, overheden, consumenten en andere gebruikers het gebruik van internet zodanig in hun activiteiten verweven hebben en er afhankelijk van zijn dat extra toeslag betalen voor toegang tot het internet economisch efficiŽnter is dan dat ze terugkeren naar een operationeel model zonder internet.
Als netwerk providers het voor het zeggen krijgen welke applicaties wel of geen toegang krijgen tot het internet dan is dan een breuk met de ontwikkeling van het internet tot nu toe en het end-to-end design principe dat aan de enorme innovatieve ontwikkeling van het internet ten grondslag heeft gelegen. Barbara van Schewick heeft een heel interessant, maar ook heel technisch, artikel geschreven over de economische gevolgen van netwerk diversiteit: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=812991

[Comment edited on Wednesday 12 May 2010 20:37]


By Tweakers user Punkie, Wednesday 12 May 2010 21:52

Marc69 wrote on Wednesday 12 May 2010 @ 20:32:
In deze context bedoel ik daarmee dat bedrijven, instellingen, overheden, consumenten en andere gebruikers het gebruik van internet zodanig in hun activiteiten verweven hebben en er afhankelijk van zijn dat extra toeslag betalen voor toegang tot het internet economisch efficiŽnter is dan dat ze terugkeren naar een operationeel model zonder internet.
Voor een goed begrip: wat ik er van begrepen heb is dat het een point of no return is voor firma's wanneer hun afhankelijkheid (aan toegang in dit geval) ervan totaal is. Dat indien iets de toegang zou verhinderen/belemmeren ze maar keuze hebben uit OF stoppen OF iedere prijs betalen tot toegang.

Waarom zou het bestaan van zulks point of no return betekenen dat er moet ingegrepen worden? Dit komt wel vaker voor: het uitputten van natuurlijke bronnen, politieke redenen (vb uranium), monopolies (we-get-to-set-the-price), ...
Marc69 wrote on Wednesday 12 May 2010 @ 20:32:
Als netwerk providers het voor het zeggen krijgen welke applicaties wel of geen toegang krijgen tot het internet dan is dan een breuk met de ontwikkeling van het internet tot nu toe en het end-to-end design principe dat aan de enorme innovatieve ontwikkeling van het internet ten grondslag heeft gelegen. Barbara van Schewick heeft een heel interessant, maar ook heel technisch, artikel geschreven over de economische gevolgen van netwerk diversiteit: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=812991
Daarin kan ik volgen ondanks?/dankzij? dat ik geen studie op dat gebeid heb verricht. In een "normale" economische context zou het gebruik van selectieve toegang tot een goed worden afgestraft omdat de mensen gewoon naar de concurrentie zouden stappen. Dit is zo voor internet toegang maar niet tot de toegang van content/applications omdat ieder stuk uniek is. En het "one monopoly rent" idee is zoek in ict, dat acht ik wel bewezen met de vele zaken zoals microsoft met browsers, intel met chipsetlicenties, device met appstore ,....

Maar er blijft een gat: een isp is geen monopolist en kan dus niet vrij discrimineren op basis van technische toegang alleen. Indien de content industrie zich zou richten op samenwerking of afpersing van isp's dan zou er een potentieel gevaar kunnen ontstaan. Een gevaar waarvoor ik weinig argumenten zie dat deze reeel is.

By Tweakers user tiefschwarz, Wednesday 12 May 2010 23:41

Punkie wrote on Wednesday 12 May 2010 @ 21:52:
[...]

Voor een goed [...] (we-get-to-set-the-price)
Het puur metajuridische (rechtsfilosofisch) standpunt hier is gebaseerd dat ze die toegang tot de toegevoegde waarde kunnen ontnemen, terwijl zij maar deels bij hebben gedragen aan de toegevoegde waarde. Die 'investering' krijgen ze al terug in de meerwaarde die hun netwerk daarmee ontvangt. Natuurlijke bronnen daarentegen zijn een fysiek eigendom, namelijk van degene aan wie de grond toebehoort.
Het point of no return is geen reden voor regelgeving, maar het geeft aan welke machtspositie providers kunnen krijgen en hoe sterk deze positie is. De vraag is of dat wenselijk is. Die vraag wordt onder andere door van Schewick gedeeltelijk wordt beantwoord, maar dan vanuit een economisch perspectief.
Punkie wrote on Wednesday 12 May 2010 @ 21:52:
Daarin kan ik [...] dat deze reeel is.
Je moet applicaties in de breedste zin van het woord zien, vergelijkbaar met wat vaak onderscheiden wordt als de application layer van het netwerk. Dat wil dus eigenlijk zeggen: alles waarvoor een end-point het netwerk kan gebruiken. Dat kan zijn het versturen van een file via ftp, een mail via pop of imap, voip etc. In deel I-C legt van Schewick uit dat door de specifieke economische eigenschappen van het Internet er geen sprake hoeft te zijn van een monopolie in de markt van het primaire goed (internet toegang) om applicaties schade toe te brengen door middel van uitsluiting. Vooral het network economics effect en de afwezigheid van een economies of scale zijn hier debet aan. Een voorbeeld: provider A, geen monopolist maar substantieel marktaandeelhouder, blokkeert MSN Messenger. Doordat minder mensen in het verzorgingsgebied gebruik kunnen maken van MSN is het product daarom ook minder waardevol voor gebruikers buiten het verzorgingsgebied. Ze kunnen immers niet met de mensen in het verzorgingsgebied communiceren. Dit is een voorbeeld van het networks economics effect, hoe meer mensen er aan deelnemen, hoe waardevoller de applicatie wordt (vgl. skype, facebook, hyves, google docs, e-mail etc.). Wanneer het ook nog eens zo is dat elke opvolgende gebruiker extra inkomen oplevert dan is het logisch om applicaties uit te gaan sluiten om ze zelf te verkopen.
In een economie of scales is er een bepaalde ideale afzetgrootte. Kort en onvolledig gezegd: Wanneer je meer gaat produceren, maak je minder winst per product. Dat is bij veel internet producten en diensten niet het geval. Daar is veelal een hoge investering vooraf noodzakelijk, en zijn de kosten voor additionele gebruikers laag. Bijvoorbeeld het maken van een dure website, waar iedere gebruiker die zich registreert relatief weinig kosten meebrengt. Dan is het belang om anderen uit te sluiten snel gemaakt. En zo zijn er nog legio voorbeelden die aangehaald worden waarom providers een economisch belang hebben anderen uit te sluiten en eigen diensten aan te bieden. Ondertussen stuit het wel innovatie omdat nieuwe applicaties niet langer kunnen rekenen op een enorme pool van gebruikers die het zouden kunnen proberen. Overigens hebben we in Nederland een vrij breed aanbod, maar in andere landen is het veel meer beperkt.

Dit geheel speelt zich echter op een ander gebied af van de netwerk neutraliteit discussie en is voornamelijk economisch georiŽnteerd. Ik besteed hier in mijn thesis bijna 15 pagina's aan, want het is een heel belangrijk aspect. Waar het hierboven echter om gaat is de simpele redenering, los van alle economische verhalen, dat drie factoren samengevoegd een meerwaarde kennen 1 + 1 + 1 = 5. Die extra waarde van 2 daar maakt iedereen gebruik van: toegang tot het netwerk is waardevoller dankzij de andere twee componenten, content en informatie kan makkelijk worden verspreid, en eind-punten kunnen veel meer applicaties gebruiken dan wanneer ze niet aangesloten zijn. Wanneer netwerk neutraliteit niet in bepaalde mate zou worden gerespecteerd betekent dat eigenlijk dat een van degenen die een bijdrage levert de mogelijkheid krijgt tot het uitsluiten van anderen of in elk geval het beperken van anderen in dat gebruik. Daar is geen juridische basis voor te vinden om die situatie toe te laten. Sterker nog, het zou onjuist zijn om dat toe te laten, omdat de vruchten van het werk van drie componenten ter uitwinning van een zou komen.

Comments are closed